Principles of Engineering Syllabus
 

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

Principles of Engineering is a course in which students explore the nature of engineering and the skills fundamental to all engineering fields, as well as the role of quality assurance and quality control procedures in manufacturing. Emphasis is placed on actual projects and presentations and the use of modern tools (e.g., CAD). The course can be enhanced by cooperation with local manufacturing facilities, which can provide real measurement data and opportunities for on-site visits to witness engineering tasks and projects, and quality-control data collection.

 

It is strongly recommended that administration and guidance follow the scope and sequence

and course recommendations as listed.

 

Recommended:                                             Computer Aided Drafting, Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II

 

Recommended Credits:                               1         

 

Recommended Grade Level(s):                   10th, 11th, or 12th

 

Number of Competencies in Course:        60

 

                       


 

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

 

STANDARDS

 

  1. Students will perform safety examinations and maintain safety records.

     

  2. Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success in the school, community, and workplace.

     

  3. Students will integrate reading, math, and science skills and understand the impact of academic achievement in the workplace.

     

  4. Students will research, define, identify, and apply energy sources.

     

  5. Students will research, define, identify, and apply power sources.

     

  6. Students will research, define, identify, and apply principles of materials and structures.

     

  7. Students will use statistical tools to assure quality in manufacturing processes.

 

8.0       Students will produce workable engineering designs according to specifications and with given parameters.

 

  1. Students will construct a structure consisting of mechanical and electrical materials using 3-D engineering designs.

     

  2. Students will analyze the impact of quality on cost and productivity, product design, and manufacturing processes.

 

11.0     Students will explore careers available in the engineering and manufacturing areas.


PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

 

STANDARD 1.0

 

Students will perform safety examinations and maintain safety records.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

1.1       Demonstrate a positive attitude regarding safety practices and issues.

1.2       Use and inspect personal protective equipment.

1.3       Inspect, maintain, and employ safe operating procedures with tools and equipment, such as hand and power tools, ladders, scaffolding, and lifting equipment.

1.4       Demonstrate continuous awareness of potential hazards to self and others and respond

appropriately.

1.5       Assume responsibilities under HazCom (Hazard Communication) regulations.

1.6       Adhere to responsibilities, regulations, and Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) policies to protect coworkers and bystanders from hazards.

1.7       Adhere to responsibilities, regulations, and Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) policies regarding reporting of accidents and observed hazards, and regarding emergency response procedures.

1.8       Demonstrate appropriate related safety procedures.

1.9       Pass with 100 % accuracy a written examination relating to safety issues

1.10     Pass with 100% accuracy a performance examination relating to safety.

1.11     Maintain a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations

for which the student.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

1.1A    Is attentive during safety discussions.

1.1B    Actively seeks information about safe procedures.

1.1C    Responds positively to instruction, advice, and correction regarding safety issues.

1.1D    Does not deliberately create or increase hazards, such as by horseplay, practical jokes, or creating distractions.

1.1E     Reports to school or work physically ready to perform to professional standards, such as rested, or not impaired by medications, drugs, alcohol, etc.

1.2       Selects, inspects, and uses the correct personal protective equipment for the assigned task.

1.3A    Inspects power tools for intact guards, shields, insulation, and other protective devices.

1.3B    Inspects extension cords for the presence of a functional ground connection, prior to use.

1.3C    Operates and maintains tools in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions and as

required by regulation or company policy.

1.3D    Properly places and secures ladders and scaffolding prior to use.

1.4A    Is observant of personnel and activities in the vicinity of the work area.

1.4B    Warns nearby personnel, prior to starting potentially hazardous actions.

1.5A    When asked to use a new hazardous material, retrieves MSDSs (material safety data

sheets), and identifies the health hazards associated with the new material.

1.5B    Reports hazards found on the job site to the supervisor.

1.6A    Erects shields, barriers, and signage to protect coworkers and bystanders prior to starting potentially hazardous tasks.

1.6B    Provides and activates adequate ventilation equipment as required by the task.

1.7A    Reports all injuries to self to the immediate supervisor.

1.7B    Reports observed unguarded hazards to their immediate supervisor.

1.8       Complies with personal assignments regarding emergency assignments.

1.9       Passes with 100% accuracy a written examination relating specifically to content area.

1.10     Passes with 100% accuracy a performance examination relating specifically to welding tools, equipment and supplies.

1.11     Maintains a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Conduct a practice drill simulating a hazardous solvent spill in which an emergency action plan is to be implemented.
  • Instruct a visitor to obviously approach the vicinity of a student conducting a hazardous

activity and note the level of awareness demonstrated by the student.              

  • For a project requiring the use of ladders and/or scaffolding, note the proper placement

and securing procedures followed by students.

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM). What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, 1995. International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

Manufacturing Skill Standards Council. A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence (draft skill standards for manufacturing.) Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, 2001. Ford Academy of Manufacturing Sciences (FAMS curriculum). Project Lead the Way curriculum. Mathematics/Quality/Teamwork content.


 

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

 

STANDARD 2.0

 

Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success in the school, community, and workplace.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

2.1       Cultivate positive leadership skills.

2.2       Participate in the student organization directly related to their program of study as an integral part of classroom instruction.

2.3       Assess situations, apply problem-solving techniques and decision-making skills within the school, community, and workplace.

2.4       Participate as a team member in a learning environment.

2.5       Respect the opinions, customs, and individual differences of others.

2.6       Build personal career development by identifying career interests, strengths, and

            opportunities.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

2.1A    Demonstrate character and leadership using creative and critical thinking skills.

2.1B    Uses creative thought process by “thinking outside the box.”

2.2A    Relates the creed, purposes, motto, and emblem of their student organization, directly related to personal and professional development.

2.2B    Plans and conducts meetings and other business according to accepted rules of parliamentary procedure.

2.3A    Makes decisions and assumes responsibilities.

2.3B    Analyzes a situation and uses the Professional Development Program or career technical student organization materials directly related to the student’s program of study to resolve it.

2.3C    Understands the importance of learning new information for both current and

            future problem solving and decision making.

2.4A    Organizes committees and participates in functions.

2.4B    Cooperates with peers to select and organize a community service project.

2.5A    Researches different customs and individual differences of others.

2.5B    Interacts respectfully with individuals of different cultures, gender, and

            backgrounds.

2.5C    Resolves conflicts and differences to maintain a smooth workflow and classroom

            environment.

2.6A    Creates personal career development by identifying career interests, strengths,

            and opportunities.

2.6B    Identifies opportunities for career development and certification requirements.

2.6C    Plans personal educational paths based on available courses and current career

            goals.

2.6D    Creates a resume that reflects student’s skills, abilities, and interests.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

  • Create a leadership inventory and use it to conduct a personal assessment.
  • Participate in various career technical student organizations’ programs and/or competitive events.
  • Implement an annual program of work.
  • Prepare a meeting agenda for a specific career technical student organization monthly meeting.
  • Attend a professional organization meeting.
  • Develop a program of study within their career opportunities.
  • Participate in the American Spirit Award competition with SkillsUSA.
  • Complete Professional Development Program Level I and Level II, SkillsUSA.

 

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM). What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, 1995. International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

Manufacturing Skill Standards Council. A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence (draft skill standards for manufacturing.) Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, 2001. Ford Academy of Manufacturing Sciences (FAMS curriculum). Project Lead the Way curriculum. Mathematics/Quality/Teamwork content.


PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

 

STANDARD 3.0

 

Students will integrate reading, writing, math, and science skills and understand the impact of academic achievement in the work place.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

3.1       Assume responsibility for accomplishing classroom assignments and workplace goals within accepted time frames.

  1. Develop advanced study skills.
  2. Demonstrate and use written and verbal communication skills so others can understand.
  3. Read and understand technical documents such as regulations, manuals, reports, forms, graphs, charts, and tables.
  4. Apply the foundations of mathematical principles such as algebra, geometry, and advanced math to solve problems.
  5. Apply basic scientific principles and methods to solve problems and complete tasks.
  6. Understand computer operations and related applications to input, store, retrieve, and output information as it relates to the course.
  7. Research, recognize, and understand the interactions of the environment and green issues as they relate to the course work and to a global economy.

           

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

3.1A    Uses appropriate time management to achieve goals.

3.1B    Arrives at school on time each day.

3.1C    Completes assignments and meets deadlines.

3.2A    Assesses current personal study skills.

3.2B    Demonstrates advanced note-taking ability.

3.2C    Formulates appropriate study strategies for given tasks.

3.3A    Communicates ideas, information, and messages in a logical manner.

3.3B    Fills out forms, time sheets, reports, logs, and documents to comply with class and project

            requirements.

3.4A    Reads and understands technical documents and uses industry jargon, acronyms,

            and terminology related to machining appropriately.

3.4B    Recognizes the meaning of specialized words or phrases unique to the career and

            machining industry.

3.5A    Utilizes computation in adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing of whole

            numbers, fractions, decimals, and percents.

3.5B    Chooses the right mathematical method or formula to solve a problem.

3.5C    Performs math operations accurately to complete classroom and lab tasks. 

3.6A    Understands scientific principles critical to the course.

3.6B    Applies scientific principles and technology to solve problems and complete tasks.

3.6C    Has knowledge of the scientific method (e.g., identifies the problem, collects

            information, forms opinions, and draws conclusions).

3.7A    Uses basic computer hardware (e.g., PCs, printers) and software to perform tasks

            as required for the course work.             

3.7B    Understands capabilities of computers and common computer terminology (e.g,

            program, operating system).

3.7C    Applies the appropriate technical solution to complete tasks.

3.7D    Inputs data and information accurately for the course requirements.

3.8A    Researches and recognizes green trends in career area and industry. 

3.8B    Examines current environmentally friendly trends.

3.8C    Applies sustainability practices by understanding processes that are non-polluting,

            conserving of energy and natural resources, and economically efficient.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

  • Examine and compile different learning styles for portfolios.
  • Create calendars containing all activities and obligations for one month. Discusses how to handle conflicting or competing obligations then complete daily and weekly plans showing tasks, priorities, and scheduling.
  • Complete self-assessments of study habits.
  • Compute precise and exact measurements.
  • Explore study strategies for different subjects and tasks then analyze two homework assignments and select the best strategies for completing them.
  • Create “life maps” showing necessary steps or “landmarks” along the path to personal, financial, educational, and career goals.
  • Take notes during counselor classroom visits and work in small groups to create flow charts of the path options.
  • List attitudes that lead to success then rate individually in these areas. Work together to suggest strategies for overcoming the weaknesses identified own and partners’ self-assessments then share with the class the strategies developed.
  • Research the Internet and other technology to collect and analyze data concerning climate change.
  • Keep a data file of alternative energy sources and the sources’ impact on the environment.
  • Develop a recycling project at home or for the school environment.

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM). What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, 1995. International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

Manufacturing Skill Standards Council. A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence (draft skill standards for manufacturing.) Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, 2001. Ford Academy of Manufacturing Sciences (FAMS curriculum). Project Lead the Way curriculum. Mathematics/Reading/Communications content.


PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

 

STANDARD 4.0

 

Students will research, define, identify, and apply energy sources.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

  1. Research and identify the components of mechanisms.

4.2       Explain and demonstrate the principles to transmit energy within a system by manipulating force, speed, and distance.

  1. Analyze and calculate mechanical advantage ratios of input versus output of mechanisms.

4.4       Analyze and calculate loss of energy from mechanical systems.

  1. Define and explain the classifications of energy sources.
  2. Explain the challenges faced in obtaining energy from various sources.
  3. Determine and present the alternatives of implementing emerging energy technology.
  4. Convert power forms from one to another.

4.9       Define and explain the principles of thermodynamics including conductivity.

           

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

4.1A    Identify and describe the types of gears, sprockets, pulley systems, and simple machines.

4.1B    Identify and explain the functions of the six simple machines.

4.2       Calculate and measure forces and distances that are implemented in a mechanical system..

4.3A    Calculate mechanical advantage and drive ratios of mechanisms.

4.3B    Calculate work and power in mechanical systems.

4.5       Research and categorize energy sources.

4.8A    Define the different types of power conversions.

4.8B    Analyze and calculate power in a system for the conversion from electrical to mechanical.

4.8C    Determine the efficiency of a system that is converted between an electrical input and a mechanical output.

4.8D    Calculate and apply Ohm’s Law on electrical circuits.

4.9A    Design, construct, and test recyclable insulation materials.

4.9B    Define and complete the calculations for conduction, R-values, and radiation.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

  • Students present a PowerPoint presentation using findings on engineering career opportunities after doing a Web search for engineering jobs.
  • Students compile news stories involving the impact of engineering on society and the transformation of jobs to foreign countries.
  • Students report on observations and data gathered during field trips to area sites with active engineering facilities.

     

    INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

     

    Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM). What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, 1995. International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

    Manufacturing Skill Standards Council. A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence (draft skill standards for manufacturing.) Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, 2001. Project Lead the Way curriculum. Career exploration content. Total Quality Management, SkillsUSA

     

     

    PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

     

    STANDARD 5.0

     

    Students will research, define, identify, and apply power sources.

     

    LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

     

    The student will:

  • Students present a PowerPoint presentation using findings on engineering career opportunities after doing a Web search for engineering jobs.
  • Students compile news stories involving the impact of engineering on society and the transformation of jobs to foreign countries.
  • Students report on observations and data gathered during field trips to area sites with active engineering facilities.
  1. Research and define fluid power systems.
  2. Explain the primary components of fluid systems and demonstrate the functions of all fluid power systems.
  3. Calculate and analyze input and output forces.
  4. Research scientific laws that are demonstrated through fluid power systems.
  5. Identify and define standard schematic symbols and functions that are used to illustrate fluid power designs.

               

    PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

     

    The student:

    5.1A    Identify and define pneumatic and hydraulic power systems.

    5.1B    Define and distinguish between hydrodynamic and hydrostatic systems.

    5.2       Identify and explain the basic components and functions of fluid power systems.

    5.3       Calculate and measure forces and distances that are implemented in a fluid power system.

    5.4A    Calculate values in a fluid power system utilizing Pascal’s Law.

    5.4B    Calculate flow rate, flow velocity, and mechanical advantage in a hydraulic system.

    5.5       Differentiate between pressure, absolute pressure, temperature, and absolute temperature.

     

    SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

     

  • Students will illustrate, through a presentation, devices that utilize fluid power and the function of the fluid power in those systems.
  • Students will identify and explain the functions of a reservoir, receiver, pump, compressor, a valve, and a cylinder.
  • Students will design, construct, and examine a hydraulic device.
  • Students will design, construct, and examine a pneumatic device.
  • Students will create a CAD design or use 3-D modeling software of the hydraulic or pneumatic design.

     

    INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

     

    Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM). What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, 1995. International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

    Manufacturing Skill Standards Council. A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence (draft skill standards for manufacturing.) Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, 2001. Project Lead the Way curriculum. Career exploration content. Total Quality Management, SkillsUSA

     

     

     

    PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

     

    STANDARD 6.0

     

    Students will research, define, identify and apply principles of materials and structures.

     

    LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

     

    The student will:

    6.1    Research and define materials that are used in the construction of structures.

    6.2    Define and illustrate synthetic materials and their properties.6.3Define and illustrate raw

             materials and its properties.

    6.3    Investigate the process in which engineers consider the material properties and costs in the

             creation of structures.

    6.4    Explore the manufacturing process for the conversion of raw materials into consumer

             goods.

    6.5    Research and explain the government agencies that govern the construction of structures.

    6.6    Research and explain the government agencies that govern recycling materials and codes.

               

    PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

     

    The student:

    6.1A    Examine and define materials used in selected products or structures.

    6.1B    Calculate the density and volume of materials.

    6.2       Identify and define synthetic materials and its properties.

    6.3       Identify and define raw materials and its properties.

    6.4       Research the availability and costs of using specific materials for construction.

    6.5       Identify the manufacturing process used in the construction of specific structures.

    6.6       Investigate the role and the authority of government agencies in using raw materials for construction.

               

     

    SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

     

  • Students will investigate using the various resources to illustrate, through a presentation, materials of selected products.
  • Students will calculate the density and volume of selected materials.
  • Students will design using CAD or a 3-D modeling software and construct a structure using raw materials.
  • Students will design using CAD or a 3-D modeling software and construct a structure using synthetic materials.

     

     

    INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

     

    Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM). What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, 1995. International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

    Manufacturing Skill Standards Council. A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence (draft skill standards for manufacturing.) Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, 2001. Project Lead the Way curriculum. Career exploration content. Total Quality Management, SkillsUSA

     

    PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

     

    STANDARD 7.0

     

    Students will use statistical tools to assure quality in manufacturing processes.

     

    LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

     

    The student will:

    7.1       Identify types of tools, including data acquisition and measuring tools, used in quality control.

    7.2       Perform statistical procedures commonly used to monitor quality in manufacturing.

    7.3       Use statistical process control concepts to evaluate and modify manufacturing processes.

     

    PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

     

    The student:

    7.1A    Define Total Quality Management and explain the concepts and principles.

    7.1B    Explain how continuous improvement in tools can affect the manufacturing process.

    7.1C    Define and explain the differences/similarities between quality assurance (QA) and quality control.

    7.1D    Explain why the quality assurance process is critical to a manufacturing/engineering process.

    7.2A    Demonstrates basic statistical procedures used to collect, analyze, and report data.

    7.2B    Communicates statistical concepts using common QA reporting methods, including control charts, histograms, pie charts, and statistical measures (average, range).

    7.2C    Performs basic mathematical calculations, calibrations, and measurements.

    7.3A    Designs a sampling plan based on information including previous history of failure and target quality goals.

    7.3B    Performs a Pareto Chart analysis.

    7.3C    Traces the source of any large disparity using the following tools and concepts:

    • control charts
    • histograms and specifications
    • ·variability and predictability
    • shape of a distribution, measures of center, measures of spread
    • interpreting a curve and plotting the X-bar and R control chart
    • special cause variation

      7.3D    Recommends modifications to a manufacturing process based on statistical process control data.

       

       

      SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

       

       

    • Students apply basic statistics (mean, range) used in QA to data collected on common school processes (e.g., flow of students through a doorway, expenditures in cafeteria).
    • Students use MIL-STD105D to create sampling plans for given processes, based on information gathered at a local manufacturing plant.
    • Students measure a poorly controlled process (e.g., breaking pasta noodles) to collect data, apply an inspection process, and summarize the data, comparing it to a specified tolerance.
    • Students analyze data provided by a local manufacturing facility, using an X-bar/R-chart, comparing it to control parameters provided by the facility.
    •  

       

      INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

       

      Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM). What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, 1995. International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

      Manufacturing Skill Standards Council. A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence (draft skill standards for manufacturing.) Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, 2001. Ford Academy of Manufacturing Sciences (FAMS curriculum). Project Lead the Way curriculum. Mathematics/Quality content. Total Quality Management, SkillsUSA.

       

       

       

      PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

       

      STANDARD 8.0

       

      Students will produce workable engineering designs according to specifications and within given parameters.

       

      LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

       

      The student will:

  1. Design a mechanism project
  2. Create a mechanism project using a student-generated design.

    8.3       Design and produce an electrical circuit board.

    8.4       Design and produce an electrical system

     

    PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

     

    The student:

    8.1A    Produces and presents mechanism product concepts, including constraints on time, resources, and so on, for approval.

    8.1B    Completes, documents, and presents a product design that satisfies the concept constraints for approval.

    8.1C    Creates prototype production plans that satisfy the concept constraints and present them for approval.

    8.2A    Executes their design and production plans to produce working prototypes.

    8.2B    Evaluates their prototypes and determines whether they meet their concepts and imposed constraints.

    8.3A    Define and list the properties and principles of atoms

    8.3B    Define voltage and list the properties and principles on how it can be produced.

    8.3C    Explain and examine the difference between conductors and insulators

    8.3D    Explain the relation between voltage, current, and resistance.

    8.3E     Demonstrate problems using OHM’s Law.

    8.3F     Explain and demonstrate the basic characteristics of a series and parallel circuit

    8.3G    Calculate the total amount of resistance in a series, parallel, and series-parallel circuit

    8.4A    Describe electronic system components and explain how they operate.

    8.4B    Describe the basic electronic characteristics of solid-state devices.

     

    SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

     

     

  3. Students complete a mechanism design project from concept to prototype, with appropriate approval stages throughout the process.
  4. Students serve as members of engineering teams.
  5.  

     

     

     

     

     

    INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

     

    Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM). What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, 1995. International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

    Manufacturing Skill Standards Council. A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence (draft skill standards for manufacturing.) Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, 2001. Ford Academy of Manufacturing Sciences (FAMS curriculum). Project Lead the Way curriculum. Mathematics/Design/Teamwork content. Total Quality Management, SkillsUSA.

     

    PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

     

    STANDARD 9.0

     

    Students will construct a structure consisting of mechanical and electrical materials using 3-D engineering designs.

     

    LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

     

    The student will:

  1. Create and interpret engineering designs including bills of materials.
  2. Analyze drawings and generate material lists.

    9.3       Create models from drawings.           

     

    PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

     

    The student:

    9.1A    Identifies and analyzes basic blueprint terms, components, and symbols.

    9.1B    Examines and presents information on blueprints to actual locations on the print.

    9.1C    Identifies and lists different classifications of various drawings.

    9.1D    Explains the uses and importance of tolerances in interpreting drawings.

    9.1E     Explains and demonstrate the use of engineer and architect scales.

    9.1F     Demonstrates computer aided drafting and explain its concepts.

    9.1G    Determines a bill of materials based on drawings and specifications produced by others.

    9.1H    Produces a design drawing with sufficient detail and accuracy for others to be able to construct the structure.

    9.2A    Critically examines drawing specifications for self-consistency.

    9.2B    Critically examines material lists for self-consistency.

    9.3A    Creates a clay or paper model of a three-dimensional object from drawings created by others.

    9.3B    Creates a clay or paper model of a three-dimensional object from their own drawings.

     

    SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

     

  • Students read drawings and specifications produced by others.

     

  • Student groups produce drawings and design specifications for simple structures that can be constructed with cardboard or balsa wood.
  • Student groups execute the design produced by another group.
  • Student groups critique the drawings of another group before accepting the construction project.
  •  

     

     

     

     

     

     

    INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

     

    Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM). What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, 1995. International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

    Manufacturing Skill Standards Council. A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence (draft skill standards for manufacturing.) Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, 2001. Ford Academy of Manufacturing Sciences (FAMS curriculum). Project Lead the Way curriculum. Mathematics/Design content. Total Quality Management, SkillsUSA.

     

    PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

     

    STANDARD 10.0

     

    Students will analyze the impact of quality on cost and productivity, product design, and manufacturing processes.

     

    LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

     

    The student will:

    1. 10.1Analyze the relationship between process management and quality assurance.

      10.2     Evaluate the effects of quality procedures on all aspects of a manufacturing system.

                 

      PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

       

      The student:

      10.1A  Explains and lists OSHA standards.

      10.1B  Interprets and presents an MSDA.

      10.1C  Incorporates principles of process management in a manufacturing process.

      10.1D  Assesses potential advantages of process management.

      10.1E   Validates the need for feedback loops within a system.

      10.1F   Devises modifications to a manufacturing process based on quality concepts.        

      10.2A  Analyzes and quantifies (where possible) the impact of a given quality issue on cost and productivity.

      10.2B  Analyzes and quantifies (where possible) the impact of a given quality issue on product design.

      10.2C  Analyzes and quantifies (where possible) the impact of a given quality issue on manufacturing processes.

       

      SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

       

       

    2. Students analyze the role of quality in a manufacturing scenario or case study.
    3. Students research and report on quality control incidents showing the effects of inadequate quality-control procedures (e.g., Firestone tires, Challenger space shuttle disaster).
    4.  

       

      INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

       

      Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM). What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, 1995. International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

      Manufacturing Skill Standards Council. A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence (draft skill standards for manufacturing.) Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, 2001. Ford Academy of Manufacturing Sciences (FAMS curriculum). Project Lead the Way curriculum. Mathematics/Quality/Teamwork content. Total Quality Management, SkillsUSA.

       

      PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

       

      STANDARD 11.0

       

      Students will explore careers available in the engineering and manufacturing areas.

       

      LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

       

      The student will:

  1. 11.1Investigate possible career paths for engineers and engineering technicians.
  2. 11.2Examine the potential roles and responsibilities of an engineer or engineering technician.

               

    PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

     

    The student:

    11.1A  Identifies and describes the types of careers available in manufacturing/engineering.

    11.1B  Identifies educational and work experience required for identified careers.

    11.2A  Assesses the role of engineering in a technological society.

    11.2B  Identifies and lists professional organizations available for workers in manufacturing/engineering careers.

    11.2C  Compares and contrasts the functional roles of design, production, and industrial engineers.

    11.2D  Determines the roles and qualifications of specific engineers and technicians in various companies and industries based on their experiences during field trips.

    11.2E   Analyzes the roles and skills contributed by members of engineering research and development groups.

     

    SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

     

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM). What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing. Washington, DC: National Coalition for Advanced Manufacturing, 1995. International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

Manufacturing Skill Standards Council. A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence (draft skill standards for manufacturing.) Manufacturing Skill Standards Council, 2001. Project Lead the Way curriculum. Career exploration content. Total Quality Management, SkillsUSA


 

SAMPLING OF AVAILABLE RESOURCES

 

  • Introduction to Engineering Technology and Engineering.Prentice-Hall, 2001.

     

  • Introduction to Statistical Quality Control.John Wiley & Sons, 1996.

     

  • Introduction to Industrial and Systems Engineering.Prentice-Hall, 1992.
  • Achieving the Competitive Edge: A Practical Guide to World-Class Competition.John

Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1996.

  • Achieving Stretched Goals: Best Practices in Manufacturing for the New Millennium.Prentice-Hall, 1997.