AP Literature Syllabus & Materials

 

Week

Lesson Focus

Weekly Objectives

TN Standards

Assessments

Additional Notes

 1.

 Why study literature?

  • Introduce course content.
  • Discuss the purpose and value of literary study.

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  • In-class journaling
  • Participation in seminar discussion
  • Journal/discussion topics: prior experiences with reading, goals for AP Literature, the value of literature to individuals; to society.
  • “How to Mark a Book,” essay by Mortimer J. Adler, Ph.D.

 2.

 

 

 

 What makes an effective reader?

  • Observe textual details.
  • Establish connections among observations.
  • Draw from those connections a series of inferences leading to an interpretive conclusion about a piece of writing’s meaning and value.
  • Understand a work’s thematic meaning and recognize its complexity, as well as smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.
  • Engage in lively, thought-provoking discussions that explore a work’s complexity, its richness of meaning, and how meaning is embodied in literary form.

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  • Multiple-choice pretest
  • Participation in seminar discussion
  • Nightly written responses to assigned readings
  • Pretest: full-length multiple-choice practice exam to assess current skill level
  • How to Read Literature Like a Professor, Introduction & Chapter 1
  • “The Bagel,” poem by David Ignatow
  • “Shawl,” poem by Albert Goldbarth
  • “Introduction to Poetry,” poem by Billy Collins
  • Selections from Superman and Me, by Sherman Alexie
  • “Learning to Read,” poem by Franz Wright
  • “Snow,” short story by Julia Alvarez

 3.

 

 

 

 What makes an effective writer?

  • Use writing as a vehicle to understand, explain, and evaluate works of literature.
  • Gain exposure to the types of writing tasks featured on the AP Literature exam, as well as the criteria by which these tasks are assessed.
  • Develop and organize ideas in clear, coherent, and persuasive language.

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  • In-class, timed-writing
  • Vocab Test: Unit 1
  • Participation in seminar discussion
  • Nightly written responses to assigned readings

 

  • First timed essay: poetry prompt 1
  • How to Read Literature Like a Professor, Chapters 2 & 3
  • “Cathedral,” short story by Raymond Carver
  • “The Dead,” short story by James Joyce
  • “Bright Star,” poem by John Keats
  • “Delight in Disorder,” poem by Robert Herrick
  • “My Father’s Song,” poem by Simon Ortiz
  • “Promises like Pie-Crust,” poem by Christina Georgina Rossetti
  • “Sonnet 29,” Shakespeare

 4.

 

 

 

 From Analysis to Essay: Writing a Close Analysis Essay

 Major Work:
Kafka’s The Metamorphosis

 

  • Use writing as a vehicle to understand, explain, and evaluate works of literature.
  • Gain exposure to the types of writing tasks featured on the AP Literature exam, as well as the criteria by which these tasks are assessed.
  • Develop and organize ideas in clear, coherent, and persuasive language.

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  • In-class, timed writing
  • Participation in seminar discussion
  • Nightly written responses to assigned readings
  • Second timed essay: prose prompt 2
  • Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis
  • How to Read Literature Like a Professor, Ch. 12 & 23
  • “Slam, Dunk, & Hook,” poem by Yusef Komunyakaa
  • “Fast Break,” poem by Edward Hirsch
  • “Traveling through the Dark,” poem by William Stafford
  • “Woodchucks,” poem by Maxine Kumin

 5.

 

 

 

Major Work:
Wrap-up Kafka’s The Metamorphosis

 Introduction to The Victorian Novel: Dickens’s Great Expectations

 College Essay and Resume

  • Examine, analyze, and evaluate character as an element of fiction writing.
  • Observe textual details, establish connections, and make inferences.
  • Write to understand; explain; evaluate.
  • Engage in lively, thought-provoking discussions that explore a work’s complexity, its richness of meaning, and how meaning is embodied in literary form.
  • Write a personal narrative

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  • Vocab Test: Unit 2
  • In-class, timed writing
  • Participation in seminar discussion.
  • Nightly written responses to assigned readings
  • Personal narrative
  • Third timed essay: free-response, question 3
  • Kafka’s The Metamorphosis
  • Dickens’s Great Expectations, Ch. 1-15
  • How to Read Literature Like a Professor, Ch. 9 & 13

 

 

 

 

 6.

 

 

 

 Major Work: Dickens’s Great Expectations

  • Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding characterization, point of view, perspective, structure, and theme.
  • Observe textual details, establish connections, and make inferences.
  • Write to understand; explain; evaluate.
  • Engage in lively, thought-provoking discussions that explore a work’s complexity, its richness of meaning, and how meaning is embodied in literary form.

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  • Participation in seminar discussion
  • Short research project: Dickens’s world/Victorian England
  • GE dialectical journal
  • GE reading quizzes

 

  • Dickens’s Great Expectations, Ch. 16-29

 

 

 

 7.

 

 

 

 Major Work: Dickens’s Great Expectations

  • Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding characterization, point of view, perspective, structure, and theme.
  • Observe textual details, establish connections, and make inferences.
  • Write to understand; explain; evaluate.
  • Engage in lively, thought-provoking discussions that explore a work’s complexity, its richness of meaning, and how meaning is embodied in literary form.

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  • Vocab Test Unit 3
  • Participation in seminar discussion
  • GE Dialectical Journal
  • GE reading quizzes
  • Revision of personal narrative

 

  • Dickens’s Great Expectations, Ch. 30-44

 

 

 

 

 

 8.

 

 

 

Major Work:

Dickens’s Great Expectations

  • Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding characterization, point of view, perspective, structure, and theme.
  • Observe textual details, establish connections, and make inferences.
  • Write to understand; explain; evaluate.
  • Engage in lively, thought-provoking discussions that explore a work’s complexity, its richness of meaning, and how meaning is embodied in literary form.

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  • Participation in seminar discussion
  • GE Dialectical Journal
  • GE reading quizzes

 

  • Dickens’s Great Expectations, Ch. 45-59
  • Compare/contrast: original vs. revised ending

 

 

 

 

 

 9.

 

 

 

 Major Work:
Dickens’s Great Expectations

  • Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding characterization, point of view, perspective, structure, and theme.
  • Observe textual details, establish connections, and make inferences.
  • Write to understand; explain; evaluate.
  • Engage in lively, thought-provoking discussions that explore a work’s complexity, its richness of meaning, and how meaning is embodied in literary form.

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  • Vocab Test: Unit 4
  • Participation in seminar discussion
  • In-class, timed writing
  • Fourth timed essay: free-response (question 3) for Great Expectations
  • Selection of major work for choice reading assignment